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20121120
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conspired to reduce our privacy. first, there's technology. social media allowed us to share every detail of our lives intentionally and unintensely. the photo tagged on facebook, the wayward strike to reply to all button. you get the picture. we now leave a digital trail traced by anyone who buys access to it. this week, the obama campaign knew what tv shows the targeted voters watched. there's the massive explosion of the surveillance in the wake of 9/11. thanks to the petri at act and continued under the obama administration. the government has more access to info about us than at anytime in history. a small example of what this looks like. check out this graph of u.s. government from google. these are requests that don't require warrants and this doesn't include the security related requests not disclosed. for awhile, i thought the combination of these trends, the u bik wiity of technology was pushing us to a future where citizens would be unable to keep their secrets while the government keeps its secrets. i feared it would end up totally exposed to each other and the state. the stat
intelligence for thousands of years because, thanks to advancements in technology, we no longer need intelligence to survive. of course, this is hardly main stream science. but as one researcher noted, my favorite part here. a hunter/gatherer, who did not seek a solution to shelter probably died. where a modern wall street executive who made a similar mistake would receive a substantial bonus. >> ouch. >> and there you have it. >> all right, josh. >> thanks, josh. >>> now, to the software billionaire suspected of murder. john mcafee made a fortune on anti-virus software that runs on computers around the world. now, he's being chased by police in the tiny country of belize, who believe he may behind the killing of his neighbor. abc's matt gutman is covering that from miami. good morning, matt. >> reporter: good morning. john mcafee lived the kind of life in central america that scared many of the people who knew him. now, the name that was synonymous with security, could be synonymous with corruption, drugs and a mysterious murder. this photo taken for a feature about john mcafee in a
it comes to the technology that they were using to try to evade the surveillance state that they built. it's amazing. >> the other thing i find amazing is i remember going through the u.s. treasury in the height of the financial crisis, and back then, you had officials who were scribbling down important facts and figures on scrap paper because that was one of the few things they were able to legally throw away and get rid of. and if you go around other branches of the u.s. government today, people are intensely aware of the risks of e-mails being kept. if you go and talk to private sector banks, nobody working on a bank trading floor these days can possibly not be aware of the risks of tracking thoughts and e-mails. and yet somehow the military just seems not to have noticed this. it is very, very striking. >> there's one other dedataidei this "journal" story, kelley had second thoughts. and people said they made the request, quote, she was worried about the personal information being provided to investigators. >> like the diplomatic license plates. >> talk about the horse after it's left
much rather power this economy with the energy technologies that won't be viable for 30, 40 years from now as opposed to driving the economy with what's viable today. >> phil, this analysis said we could be oil exporters within the next 20 years or some what kind of an impact would that have on our economy as a whole? >> well i think it is going to give us a new form of income. it will lower our trade deficit. we were always concerned about, you know, sending all our money to china for goods and the trade deficit with china, it is not fair. guess what? we're going to be in a distinct advantage over china, not only from a trade standpoint because we're going to be able to provide them with energy they need but also because we're going to be able to attract manufacturing jobs here to the united states. why? because we're going to have the reliable, low-priced energy source for years to come. that's going to bring manufacturing back to the u.s. that will bring factories and jobs. this is historic. i'm euphoric. i've seen it coming for some time. i'm glad the international energy agency is
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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